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(Updated on 17/02/2016)

 



 

  • Dr. Seuss Honored on World Book Day - Text + Audio + Video - 2 March 2017
    "On Thursday, many people were remembering the American writer Theodore Seuss Geisel – better known as “Dr. Seuss.”
    Geisel is one of the world’s most famous authors of books for children."

    (learningenglish.voanews.com)
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory tops primary school book list - 24 July 2015
    "The list of must-read novels has been selected by 500 teachers for the National Association for the Teaching of English and the TES magazine.
    Roald Dahl's cautionary tale comes ahead of Goodnight Mister Tom.
    "Fiction teaches children how to navigate the journey of life," says TES editor Ann Mroz."

    (BBC)

  • World Book Day[1] or World Book and Copyright Day (also known as International Day of the Book or World Book Days)
    "is a yearly event on 23 April, organized by UNESCO to promote readingpublishing and copyright. In the United Kingdom, the day is instead recognised on the first Thursday in March."

    (Wikipedia)
  • World Book Day (educationscotland.gov.uk)

  • World Book Day - a lesson
    "In this integrated skills lesson, learners learn about World Book Day.
    First they work in pairs, reading and writing to complete a text about World Book Day.
    Then they read clues and complete a book-themed crossword (and find a mystery word).
    The learners will then use a simple model to write about their own favourite book and add an illustration, using some of the vocabulary they have practised.
    Finally they will read their texts in class or record themselves reading the texts.
    There is an optional activity of making a display with the final texts."

    Level: A2+
    Time: 50-60 minutes

    (teachingenglish.org.uk)

 

 

  • Council employs bouncer to protect library staff - 7 May 2010
    "A council spent nearly £1,000 on a bouncer to protect staff at a library from ''unruly'' school children...
    The library in King's Lynn was plagued by children ''running about screaming and shouting''...
    The children terrorised and tormented two female librarians...
    A council spokesman said the guard wore a white shirt, black trousers, black jacket and fluorescent armband. "

    (telegraph.co.uk)




  • Dante to dialects: EU's online renaissance
    "Site recording centuries of culture crashes with 10m hits an hour on launch day...
    The EU yesterday launched the prototype of Europeana, its bold project to digitise millions of books, artworks, manuscripts, maps, objects and films from the most important libraries, museums and archives, and provide them free to download from one website."

    (guardian.co.uk)




    (See Lesson plans)


  • CENSORSHIP :

    • 12 Books That Have (Ironically) Been Banned in the U.S.
      1. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
      2. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finnby Mark Twain
      3. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
      4. Where’s Waldo? by Martin Handford
      5. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
      6. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
      7. The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
      8. Little Red Riding Hood
      9. Sleeping Beauty
      10. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
      11. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
      12. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
      (neatorama.com)




    • NCTE's Support for the Students Right to Read 
      "NCTE offers advice, helpful documents, and other support to teachers faced with challenges to texts (e.g. literary works, films and videos, drama productions) or teaching methods used in their classrooms and schools...
      NCTE Celebrates Over 25 Years of The Students’ Right to Read. Over these years the Council has voiced its opposition to censorship and promoted intellectual freedom as portrayed in the clip from the NCTE Centennial Film. " 

      + an interesting video


    • Banned & Challenged Books
      "The ALA (American Library Association) promotes the freedom to choose or the freedom to express one's opinions even if that opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular and stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of those viewpoints to all who wish to read them."

      (ala.org)