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FOOD : CONTENTS


FOOD and DRINKS :

LITERATURE
POEMS
POSTERS
QUOTATIONS


(Updated on 16/09/2016)

 



QUOTATIONS :

 

  • Forrest Gump: My momma always said, "Life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get."
    (imdb.com)

 

LITERATURE :

 

  • Food glorious food: The best feasts in books
    "From the humble madeleine to the epic banquet, food and festivities have provided some of literature’s most memorable moments.
    Hephzibah Anderson tucks in."

    (BBC)


    "Nothing better defines young Oliver Twist than his daring request for more gruel."

 

 

  • OYSTERS AND CRABS, THE POPCORN OF SHAKESPEAREAN THEATERGOERS
    "Tudor theatergoers snacked on seafood while enjoying plays by Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe...
    Food remains and seeds indicate that the preferred snacks were oysters, crabs, mussels, periwinkles and cockles. Walnuts, hazelnuts, plums, cherries, peaches, dried raisins and figs were also popular...
    The audiences also indulged in pipe-smoking."

    (news.discovery.com)

 

 

  • Eating and Drinking With Charles Dickens
    (PBS)


    "The moment Scrooge’s hand was on the lock, a strange voice called him by his name, and bade him enter. He obeyed. It was his own room. There was no doubt about that. But it had undergone a surprising transformation… Heaped up on the floor, to form a kind of throne, were turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, great joints of meat, sucking-pigs, long wreaths of sausages, mince-pies, plum-puddings, barrels of oysters, red-hot chestnuts, cherry-cheeked apples, juicy oranges, luscious pears, immense twelfth-cakes, and seething bowls of punch, that made the chamber dim with their delicious steam… "
    - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843)

 

  • THE GINGERBREAD MAN :


    • The Gingerbread Man "(also known as The Gingerbread Boy or The Gingerbread Runner) is a fairy tale about a Gingerbread Man's escape from various pursuers and his eventual demise between the jaws of a fox..." 

      "In the 1875 St. Nicholas tale, a childless old woman bakes a gingerbread man who leaps from her oven and runs away. The woman and her husband give chase but fail to catch him. The gingerbread man then outruns several farm workers and farm animals while taunting them with the phrase:

      I've run away from a little old woman,
      A little old man,
      And I can run away from you, I can!

      The tale ends with a fox catching and eating the gingerbread man who cries as he's devoured, "I'm quarter gone...I'm half gone...I'm three-quarters gone...I'm all gone!" - a detail often omitted in subsequent versions.[1]"
      (Wikipedia)

    • The Gingerbread Man : "This week we have been retelling the story of The Gingerbread Man.
      Can you tell the story at home using our story map?
      Once upon a time…"





    • The Gingerbread man : "Click on the picture to read the story then play the game." (Niveau 5ème avec PRETERIT)
      Activity created by Renée Maufroid




    • More activities : The Gingerbread Man

 

POEMS :

 

  • The gardener's love letter - David Gibbons, Sunday Times, 1972 (sabironlangues.typepad.fr) - ACCES PAR MOT DE PASSE
    "Lettuce, beetroot to each other 
    forget those leeks of gossip 
    that sprout up now and then ; 
    accept my five-carrot ring 
    (it’all I can afford on my celery) 
    Cos if you ever leave me 
    I’ll become a has-bean 
    And a vegetable"

  • Twas The Month After Christmas - a poem
    "Nothing would fit me, not even a blouse...
    When I got on the scales there arose such a number!
    So--away with the last of the sour cream dip,
    Get rid of the fruit cake, every cracker and chip...
    I'm hungry, I'm lonesome, and life is a bore---
    But isn't that what January is for?
    Unable to giggle, no longer a riot.
    Happy New Year to all and to all a good diet!"

    (funnypoets.com)
  • To a Fish - a poem (with compound adjectives) :
    "You strange, astonished-looking, angle-faced,
    Dreary-mouthed, gaping wretches of the sea..."

    (foodreference.com)
  • Burrito Poetry
    "After you read these burrito poems, think about your favorite food. Think about how it tastes and how it makes you feel.
    Now write your own poem about it. It can be a haiku, a limerick, or any other kind of poem!"

    (towerofenglish.com)

  • Playing With My Food - a poem (thelaboroflove.com)

  • Food, Glorious Food - Oliver! Soundtrack Lyrics

 

 

POSTERS :

 

  • Classroom posters - Food
    "Use our Food poster to help you present, practise, recycle and build on language related to food.
    The Teacher's notes give you some ideas for using the ‘food’ poster with your learners."

    (teachingenglish.org.uk)